Archive for February, 2014

It’s a just guess that if you have viewed a demonic possession, you’ve perceived them all. Over the previous years, there’s been an innovation of this tale on our cinema, from The Last Exorcism up to The Rite to The Devil Inside. The Possession is yet once more an Exorcist-stimulated access to the kind and in spite of not violating any fresh ground, it’s an elegant production that astonishingly ended up being one of the many efficient films of its kind.

Kyra Sedgwick and Jeffrey Dean Morgan played as a recently separated couple Clyde and Stephanie. One day he picks up his two daughters, Clyde stagger upon a yard sale and the youngest, Em played by Natasha Calis, becomes involved in an old wooden box. As Em gets bigger, he became fixated with this box, her attitude becomes even more unpredictable. It turns out she’s come down with an awful instance of demons and the only treatment is a good shot of exorcism.

The Possession film get some originality points as it discover an alternative demonic myths. Unlike a lot of the usual ownership tales that focuses on Christian demons, this picture looks at the Jewish notion of a dybbuk, the wicked spirit of a deceased person. The dybbuk boxes offered here are based on the real story and some of the owners of the genuine box have stated terrible stories while they are the owner of the box. As Clyde search for assistance for his daughter, he ended up ensconced in the charming world of Hasidic Judaism. It is delectably interesting, in addition to a comparable unsurprising narration.

And it is really that combination of trade and sentiments that locates The Possession separate from its generation. Of course, the accessories of the all-too-admired found-footage designs are nowhere to be observed here. Even the last minute, while expecting to take into consideration the subject matter, efficiently amp up the fear while still holding the viewers to become occupied in the narration.

Ole Bornedal is the Danish director who did an amazing job of putting more  designs and color to the conventional tale. There are some wonderful set-pieces that have been put altogether with vitality, structuring to a necessarily loud, but scary finale, which work as a rewarding payoff for a film that steps its fright expertly. Producer Sam Raimi and Bornedal, knows the type well enough to comprehend that terror needs to develop. In spite of a sluggish initial act, The Possession clocks in at an ideal 90 minutes. Not each movie desires to reinvent the helm, and nothing here is mainly ground-breaking, yet this one is the most rewarding terror jaunts in quite a while.

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Great review. The movie knows well about modern monster picture and it really comes with great eye catching effects and visuals.

Dan the Man's Movie Reviews

A dash of Herman Munster would have went a long, long way.

200 years after being created, the monster of Dr. Frankenstein (Aaron Eckhart) is left to roam the world, all by his lonesome. It doesn’t help matters that he actually killed his creator’s wife, but hey, so be it. She had it coming to her I guess, right? Anyway, in the present day, the monster is found to be walking all throughout the world, where he will most likely live the last days of his life unhappy, pissed-off and always looking over his shoulder, just in case some sneaky, little demon thinks about trying something on him. One night, this does in fact happen, and the monster gets taken in as a part of the Gargoyle’s squad (lead by Miranda Otto); which is when he begins to be referred to as “Adam”. Still though, there is a catch to…

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